What should we do as a parent of a child with autism? Woodmam

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What should I do as a parent of a child with autism? What should I do if I have a child with autism in my family that is affecting family relationships? The moment a child is diagnosed with autism, some family conflicts that would normally be insignificant suddenly seem overwhelming, especially if the child has been treated for a period of time without results, and some parents choose to avoid it.

A child needs a harmonious family environment to grow up in, and mere skill training will not help him enter society. We hope that the following tips will help families with autism in some small way.

Appreciate every progress of your child.

Most families with autism suffer from anxiety because they are not sure about their child's future because they are not learning anything right now. Noticing more of your child's progress and taking pride in it can be effective in reducing parental anxiety.


Not taking it out on loved ones.

When we talk about autism with our families, we unconsciously bring a variety of emotions with us and feel conflicted and angry. These are all emotions that will come up and it is normal to feel conflicted emotions.

But remember, this topic is painful for us all, and be careful not to get angry with each other because it is autism that makes us so frustrated and angry. Also, try to see yourself as a normal family, which autism is not all about, and try to have a good time with your child and family.

Encourage and support your child.

When your child is diagnosed, as parents, it is important to actively learn about autism and make full use of the internet, special schools, training institutions, etc. This way we will meet practitioners and people who can teach us and help us and offer help.

Integrate into the autism circle as soon as possible.

Once your child is diagnosed, it is a good idea to enter the circle as soon as possible. Don't underestimate the power of "organizations" to be in the same boat because we are in the same boat, and we need to make friends with other parents who have children with autism at home.

By meeting with other parents, we may gain the support of experienced families and hear the experiences of "veteran" parents to avoid detours. And, we will also gain great strength from the people we meet.

Letting his siblings know about autism.

Many families with autism choose to have a second child with the expectation that the child will be cared for in the future. The initial intentions are good, but they must be made aware of autism. And let them do playdates and activities with their autistic loved ones on a regular basis to bring the two closer together.

Learn to talk about autism and be relaxed about describing the disorder to others. If a brother feels comfortable with the subject, so will an outsider. Conversely, if a sibling feels embarrassed about his or her brother or sister, a friend will feel this too. If a child feels inferior because they have an autistic brother, no good!

Giving other children appropriate attention.

Having a family member with autism is often very time-consuming and noticeable. Parents need to be aware that there is some time to spend with other children as well. Every child needs loving parental attention.

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